Untitled

Hammer this fact home … leaking is tantamount to aiding the enemies of the United States.

A Defense Department strategy document • Discussing the Obama administration’s Insider Threat Program, a program designed to fend against leaks to the press or elsewhere. The program predates the current Edward Snowden situation (but not the earlier AP wiretapping saga) and, as McClatchy news service reports, appears to be encouraging retribution against most kinds of leaks, whether classified or not, and focusing on the profiling of people who may be at risk of releasing such leaks. While the program allows for stronger protections for certain kinds of whistleblowing—waste, fraud, abuse—stuff like media leaks isn’t getting that kind of love under the program. (thanks Jim McBee)

fastcompany:

Snowden is reportedly a no-show for his flight from Moscow to Havana, which is packed to the brim with reporters chomping at the bit to speak with him. Gawker editor Max Reed tweeted: “A dozen journalists stuck on dry flight to Cuba watching the James Franco Oz movie.” Now the question on every conspiracy theorist’s lips is this: Did Snowden actually make it to Moscow, or is this one of the best post-Soviet intelligence ops we’ve seen in a long time? Stay tuned.

breakingnews:

French Open champion Rafael Nadal bounced in first round at Wimbledon
Barely two weeks after winning a record eighth French Open, Rafael Nadal lost in the first round at Wimbledon, losing in straight sets to Belgium’s Steve Darcis.
Nadal lost in straight sets: 7-6, 7-6, 6-4.
More from NBC Sports here.
Photo: Ben Stansall / AFP - Getty Images

breakingnews:

French Open champion Rafael Nadal bounced in first round at Wimbledon

Barely two weeks after winning a record eighth French Open, Rafael Nadal lost in the first round at Wimbledon, losing in straight sets to Belgium’s Steve Darcis.

Nadal lost in straight sets: 7-6, 7-6, 6-4.

More from NBC Sports here.

Photo: Ben Stansall / AFP - Getty Images

If you want to embrace that theory, it means that every investigative journalist in the United States who works with their sources, who receives classified information is a criminal, and it’s precisely those theories and precisely that climate that has become so menacing in the United States.

fotojournalismus:

Peru protesters push to stop $5 billion Newmont mine project

Thousands of opponents of a $5 billion gold project of Newmont Mining circled a lake high in the Andes on Monday, vowing to stop the company from eventually draining it to make way for Peru’s most expensive mine. Lake Perol is one of several lakes that would eventually be displaced to mine ore from the Conga project. Water from the lakes would be transferred to four reservoirs that the U.S. company and its Peruvian partner, Buenaventura, are building or planning to build. 

The companies say the reservoirs would end seasonal shortages and guarantee year-round water supplies to towns and farmers in the area, but many residents fear they would lose control of the water or that the mine would cause pollution.

"Why would we want a reservoir controlled by the company when we already have lakes that naturally provide us water?" asked Angel Mendoza, a member of a peasant patrol group from the town of Pampa Verde.

(Photos by Enrique Castro-Mendivil/Reuters)

Captions : 

1. An Andean woman sits on a horse as she takes a break during a march against Newmont Mining’s Conga project in Peru’s Cajamarca region June 17, 2013. 

2. Andean people protest against Newmont Mining’s Conga project during a march along the Perol lake in Peru’s region of Cajamarca June 17, 2013.

3. Andean people march during a protest along the Perol lake in Peru’s region of Cajamarca June 17, 2013.

4. Andean people march during a protest along the Perol lake in Peru’s region of Cajamarca June 17, 2013.

5. An Andean woman drinks water from the Perol lake using her hat during a protest against Newmont Mining’s Conga project at Peru’s Cajamarca region June 17, 2013.

6. An Andean man smokes a cigarette while resting along Perol lake in Peru’s Cajamarca region June 17, 2013.

7. Andean people remove rocks from the border of a reservoir, built by Newmont Mining’s Conga project next to the Perol lake, during a protest in Peru’s region of Cajamarca June 17, 2013.

8. Jose Rojas, an Andean man, flavours coca leaves with lime as he chews on the leaves while resting during a march against Newmont Mining’s Conga project, along the Perol lake in Peru’s Cajamarca region June 17, 2013.

9. Anti-riot police officers stand guard as Andean people vandalize parts of a dam during a protest in Peru’s region of Cajamarca June 17, 2013.

10. Andean people set fire to areas surrounding a dam during a protest in Peru’s region of Cajamarca June 17, 2013. 

cheatsheet:

Front Page— June 25, 2013
SCOTUS Strikes Down Key Section of Voting Rights Act: In a decision that will have major repercussions for future elections, the Supreme Court struck down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, which mandated which regions with a history of racial discrimination had to get federal approval for changes in election law.
Defense: Block Zimmerman’s Calls: Prosecutors in George Zimmerman’s second-degree murder trial sought on Monday to have the self-appointed neighborhood vigilante’s previous calls to police be admitted into evidence, while the defense has tried to block them as irrelevant to the case at hand.
U.S. to Russia: ‘Do the Right Thing’: Hope Edward Snowden is enjoying those long June nights in Moscow—Washington doesn’t want him to stay there much longer. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Tuesday urged Russia to “do the right thing” and return the fugitive leaker, who is believed to still be in Moscow despite rumors Monday that he had boarded a flight to Cuba en route to Ecuador.
Gunmen Attack Afghan Palace: Gunmen attacked the Afghan presidential palace early Tuesday morning while reporters were present for a press event with President Hamid Karzai, according to Reuters. Explosions and gunfire reportedly shook the city center and debris was visible.
Turkish Police Arrest 20 Protesters: Turkey on Tuesday cracked down on the widespread protests that have swept the country since May, detaining 20 people in Ankara. The protests began as demonstration against a planned development on a park in Istanbul, but turned into a massive statement against Prime Minister Tayyip Recep Erdogan—and there have been daily demonstrations in the capital since then.
Read More Cheats
PHOTO:  The season for pineapples (yakuza slang for hand grenades) may finally be over. Jake Adelstein and Nathalie-Kyoko Stucky on the bloody, seven-year battle between the Dojin-kai and the Seido-kai. Read more here.

cheatsheet:

Front Page— June 25, 2013

  1. SCOTUS Strikes Down Key Section of Voting Rights ActIn a decision that will have major repercussions for future elections, the Supreme Court struck down Section 4 of the Voting Rights Act, which mandated which regions with a history of racial discrimination had to get federal approval for changes in election law.
  2. Defense: Block Zimmerman’s Calls: Prosecutors in George Zimmerman’s second-degree murder trial sought on Monday to have the self-appointed neighborhood vigilante’s previous calls to police be admitted into evidence, while the defense has tried to block them as irrelevant to the case at hand.
  3. U.S. to Russia: ‘Do the Right Thing’: Hope Edward Snowden is enjoying those long June nights in Moscow—Washington doesn’t want him to stay there much longer. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry on Tuesday urged Russia to “do the right thing” and return the fugitive leaker, who is believed to still be in Moscow despite rumors Monday that he had boarded a flight to Cuba en route to Ecuador.
  4. Gunmen Attack Afghan Palace: Gunmen attacked the Afghan presidential palace early Tuesday morning while reporters were present for a press event with President Hamid Karzai, according to Reuters. Explosions and gunfire reportedly shook the city center and debris was visible.
  5. Turkish Police Arrest 20 Protesters: Turkey on Tuesday cracked down on the widespread protests that have swept the country since May, detaining 20 people in Ankara. The protests began as demonstration against a planned development on a park in Istanbul, but turned into a massive statement against Prime Minister Tayyip Recep Erdogan—and there have been daily demonstrations in the capital since then.

PHOTO:  The season for pineapples (yakuza slang for hand grenades) may finally be over. Jake Adelstein and Nathalie-Kyoko Stucky on the bloody, seven-year battle between the Dojin-kai and the Seido-kai. Read more here.

breakingnews:

Supreme Court strikes down part of Voting Rights Act
NBC News: The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld a civil rights law that requires some states to get federal permission to change their voting rules, but it struck down the formula for which jurisdictions are covered — leaving it to Congress to redraw the map.
The opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts. The vote was 5-4.
Photo: US Supreme Court building (Jewel Samad / AFP - Getty Images file)

breakingnews:

Supreme Court strikes down part of Voting Rights Act

NBC News: The Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld a civil rights law that requires some states to get federal permission to change their voting rules, but it struck down the formula for which jurisdictions are covered — leaving it to Congress to redraw the map.

The opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts. The vote was 5-4.

Photo: US Supreme Court building (Jewel Samad / AFP - Getty Images file)